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 Subject : Re:Engineering Resins for Form 2.. 10/10/2018 06:01:01 PM 
Charles Overy
Posts: 29
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Ernest,

I will beat Dean up... However, we only use the cure about 1/2 to 2/3 the time. Sometimes with very fragile parts it is nice not to cure. The standard resin parts are a bit more flexible then and don't break as easily. Presumably the cure over time but at least you get the model delivered!

Charles
 Subject : Re:Engineering Resins for Form 2.. 10/10/2018 05:57:31 PM 
Ernest Ang
Posts: 32
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Hi Charles and Billy,

We have been using our Form Wash and we absolutely love it. Thank you so much for the suggestions! I'm hoping that I'll be able to convince Dean (my boss) to get the Form Cure as well in the future, haha.
 Subject : Re:Re:Engineering Resins for Form 2.. 09/13/2018 06:03:36 PM 
Ernest Ang
Posts: 32
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Charles Overy Wrote on 09/12/2018 10:36:26 AM:
Ernest,

Tell Dean, to pull his finger out and buy the Wash machine at least. It is fantastic and well well worth the money. Big time saver and the parts come out much better than manually washing. The cure is good also and very convenient.
I am not sure that it will solve the warping issue but it will standardize your process so you know where to look.
Charles

Managed to convince Dean to get the Form Wash first yesterday, so hopefully I'll be able to persuade him to get the Form Cure next, haha. Thank you Charles!

And thank you Billy for all the recommendation as well.
 Subject : Re:Engineering Resins for Form 2.. 09/12/2018 06:25:08 PM 
William Rupe
Posts: 2
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Ernest,
Yes we love the wash and cure. It has easily paid for itself in the amount of labor saved by not having to babysit a print. You can insert a part, walk away and come back hours or days later and they will be dry and ready for the curing oven because it automatically lifts it out of the IPA so it doesn't over wash and warp. Then the cure is great too because of its convenience. Just make sure you leave supports on during as there is a bit of heat and can warp due to that.

-Billy
 Subject : Re:Engineering Resins for Form 2.. 09/12/2018 03:36:26 PM 
Charles Overy
Posts: 29
Location
Ernest,

Tell Dean, to pull his finger out and buy the Wash machine at least. It is fantastic and well well worth the money. Big time saver and the parts come out much better than manually washing. The cure is good also and very convenient.
I am not sure that it will solve the warping issue but it will standardize your process so you know where to look.
Charles
 Subject : Re:Engineering Resins for Form 2.. 09/12/2018 01:41:21 PM 
Ernest Ang
Posts: 32
Location
Thank you for the quick response and great suggestions, Charles and Billy!

- Do you orient mating parts in the same orientation so that deformations happen similarly.
I don't think we did that, but definitely worth keeping that in mind when printing in the future.

- Can you orient so that the mating surfaces are lower in the build and add more support.
Yes, that's usually what we do because of most of the deformation of the print happens at the beginning of the print (where the model base supports are).

- Can you alternately add more supports to the interior surfaces of the build.
We did that in the iterated parts that we printed later on and they definitely fit a lot better.

- Waffling or computational cross bracing- honeycombing may work but is typically hard to do with SLA type supports.
Haha, we usually just draw out our cross bracing, maybe we should look into getting Magic to do that for us.

We just got two of the Resin Tank LT, so we will probably give them a try later on and see whether any similar issue would occur. One of our Form 2 printers just had some printing issue (sometimes parts would get deformed like Frank Gehry's building), so we just sent it in for repair. Have you tried out the new resin tank yet?

Billy: Yes, I have to agree that the deformation most probably happens during the post-printing process. Are you guys using the Form Wash and Cure for your post-printing process? How do you guys like it? We only have the IPA finish kit and a UV chamber for our post-printing process.

Yes, I'll keep posting on this post if I discover anything.

Thanks again!
Ernest
Last Edited On: 09/12/2018 01:45:15 PM By Ernest Ang
 Subject : Re:Engineering Resins for Form 2.. 09/12/2018 10:58:07 AM 
William Rupe
Posts: 2
Location
Hey Ernest,
We recently got into the form2 and loved it so much we bought a second and they crank out parts all day long. We print a lot of masters and engineering check parts with them and have not had any issues so far with fit up. How are you post processing the parts? Do you have the wash and cure? For us we always have used the recommended wash time then let it dry for at least an hour outside to let all the alcohol evaporate from inside the part then go into the cure for the recommended time. We have built quite a few parts with the tough resin and love it. We also have the durable, flexible, and rigid but haven't messed with the grey pro yet. The only issues we have had were when removed supports for the cure cycle as that has a bit of heat for thinner walls and can warp parts pretty good. We have even printed smaller parts on the form2 and then mated them with Objet or outsourced SLA parts without an issue. I would look into post processing as your culprit.

Hope this helps,
Billy
 Subject : Re:Engineering Resins for Form 2.. 09/11/2018 08:39:41 PM 
Charles Overy
Posts: 29
Location
Ernest,

We have had the same problem trying to fit together even moderately sized form2 parts

We do keep the durable resin on hand for when we need a strong part. It is great - much less brittle and very helpful for an industrial design part, fixture or something. However most of those parts have been small and we do not have data on if it is more dimensional. We have tried dental (at the salespersons suggestion) and it was a waste of money. Have not tried Grey Pro or Tough. The Durable does take longer to run.

Things that might work?..
Do you orient mating parts in the same orientation so that deformations happen similarly.
Can you orient so that the mating surfaces are lower in the build and add more support.
Can you alternately add more supports to the interior surfaces of the build.
Waffling or computational cross bracing- honeycombing may work but is typically hard to do with SLA type supports.

I think there is a sweet spot with wall thickness as you don't want to increase weight and the membrane separation stresses too much.

I wonder if the type of tank makes a difference - standard tank vs the new extended use tanks.

It would be great if you can post if you discover anything. Alternately we are happy to collaborate on some research if you have a standard part.

Thanks
Charles
 Subject : Engineering Resins for Form 2.. 09/11/2018 08:19:28 PM 
Ernest Ang
Posts: 32
Location
Hi fellow APMMers,

I am wondering has anyone tried out any of the engineering resins for the Form 2 printers?

We have been using just the regular white resins for small and big prints but occasionally we will experience some sort of twisting or deforming (due to heat or post-curing process or wall thickness issue). We do also notice that sometimes the same files printed on the same printer might have different accuracy as some sections might be off by a few thousandths to ten thousandths, none of the parts will ever be the same.

We are currently working on a project that requires a smooth surface while also the needs to fit two parts together. I have attached some photos of the failed parts from that particular project. Both the parts are not fitting with each other even though the 3D files suppose to fit due to some warping of the wall (from the post-curing process and us having the wall thickness being too thin-without cross-bracing).

Of course, we had corrected the issue and the one we have right now fits a lot better after we added cross-bracing and thicker wall.
However, we would like to know whether we can achieve better consistency and accuracy in the print by using any of the engineering resins instead, sort of like the performance you can achieve from a Stratasys FDM printers using ABS material.

We are thinking of either trying out the Grey Pro or Tough resins.

Any suggestions/feedbacks would be appreciated!

Ernest Ang
Zoyes Creative Group

Last Edited On: 09/11/2018 08:30:46 PM By Ernest Ang
 
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